« The score can be troublesome even for a professional choir | Main | Loves, sweat and tears »

February 14, 2009

Black Magic

Mail & Guardian Online (Johannesburg, South Africa):

Touring can be a bitch: Joseph Shabalala, composer and founding member of Ladysmith Black Mambazo (LBM), can’t remember what month or day it is or which city he is in. He is in Fredericks in the state of Maryland, according to the hotel receptionist. With that anodyne faux-cheeriness particular to Americans, she recited “It’s a fine day at the Fairfield Inn. My name is Nathalie, how-can-I-help-you?”

I heard this close to 30 times as I desperately tried to get hold of Shabalala. He had gone walkabout and to exacerbate matters the tour management had confused his room number with one from a previous hotel. I’d been leaving messages on somebody else’s answering machine. Touring can be a bitch, sometimes.

Finally, with Shabalala on the telephone, I had him rifling through papers in search of an itinerary for the group’s three-month North American tour: “Hold on, hold on, we have a book where we write this down so we don’t forget where we are,” says the 68-year-old. It turns out that LBM had been on stage in Salem, Oregon, this weekend when they received news that their album, Ilembe: Our Tribute to King Shaka (Gallo), had won the 2009 Grammy for best traditional world music album.

“Mitch [Goldstein, LBM’s business manager] called us from Los Angeles to say: ‘I have the Grammy with me!’ Oooh, if I had a camera then! It was a surprise for us and we celebrated with the crowd,” says Shabalala. LBM have also been nominated 13 times for the Grammys -- no other South African artist or group has been able to match this record.

Shabalala’s conversation occasionally drifts off into song when he accentuates a point or idea. His voice quivers, growls and flies off on ethereal tangents, as though the harmony says so much more than mere words, as though the spirit he says inspires and possesses his compositions cannot be contained in language alone.

I ask why Shaka has featured so prominently in LBM’s work and he veers off on to a high-velocity poem in praise of the Zulu monarch. Slowing down, he says: “It happened by itself from inside me, to encourage people nowadays, to tell black people to remember Shaka and Nelson Mandela and learn values from them. To learn about their own identity.”

Shabalala adds that as a young boy, his father, a traditional healer,encouraged him to learn to praise Shaka through izimbongi poetry, so as to glean lessons from an “amazing” life characterised by resilience, pride and a burning urge to improve one’s circumstance. Later, he says of LBM’s brand of isiscathamiya: “We are not singing this kind of music to make ourselves famous -- we are singing to remind our people of who they are.” He reiterates LBM’s role as teachers as much as they are vocalists.

Ilembe, as with many of its predecessors, is imbued with a morality drawn from traditional Zulu culture and Christianity. Simple lyrics preach fidelity and loyalty in relationships (Vela Nsizwa), adherence to religious faith and teachings (This Is the Way We Do and Iphel’ Emasini) and, of course, learning from the life of Shaka (Ilembe). Read more.

Posted by acapnews at February 14, 2009 12:00 AM

Comments

Post a comment




Remember Me?